It's All About The Music 




What is Music Therapy? 

"Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.

Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strengths and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in the therapeutic context, clients' abilities are strengthened and transferred to other areas of their lives. Music therapy also provides avenues for communication that can be helpful to those who find it difficult to express themselves in words. Research in music therapy supports its effectiveness in many areas such as: overall physical rehabilitation and facilitating movement, increasing people's motivation to become engaged in their treatment, providing emotional support for clients and their families, and providing an outlet for expression of feelings."
-musictherapy.org







  My obsession with the subject of Music Therapy started many months ago. There was an article in my city's local weekend paper about a Music Therapist working out of the Willamette University. Though, I should probably remember the details of this article, being as it was what started this whole "mess", I don't. I happen to believe that we focus on the things we need to see, and in this case, just the knowledge that Music Therapy was an actual career choice out there made me research every bit of it that I could. Now, I don't have the means to go off and get a career as a music therapist, but I can, however, apply my knowledge to my own surroundings. They say "Think Globally, Act Locally", so that is what I am doing with my family, friends, and neighbors as it comes up in conversation. I've decided to create this page here in DGT so that my (little bit of) knowledge can help those of you who are not in my residential radius. Though, I fully encourage you to visit MusicTherapy.org (link above) for everything you need to know on this subject, I have included many articles and videos that I have enjoyed and would love to share them with you.
 -Trinity Lost



Helping Alzheimer's Patients With Music Therapy






 How does Music Therapy benefit children with special needs?


Music Therapist, Ryan Judd has been working with special needs children for 14 years. In this video, he takes us through a few of his sessions, so that we can see the changes in the children, and how the therapy is helping them communicate and socialize. You can also access videos on his website that help you learn how to use calming techniques at home, and get tips on ways to engage children with musical activities. 



For more information, please visit:
The Rhythm Tree 


Find a Music Therapist in your area!

American Music Therapy Association

Certified Music Therapist Search


Also Check Out:
Adam's Camp
For more on special needs therapy
Check out this story on CNN!


This next video is one that I play often in my home. I frequently have to put headphones on and listen to music with
 
Isochronic Tones. Isochronic tones are regular beats of a single tone that are used alongside monaural beats and binaural beats in the process of what is called Brainwave Entrainment. In it's simplest level, an isochronic tone is a tone that is being turned on and off rapidly. These videos are all over youtube, and without them, I would probably still be up from yesterday. 

This one in particular focuses on Sleeping Issues, Anxiety and Pain Relief, which for me, helps tremendously! Try it out for a week. Play with different videos and tones. I suffer from insomnia and I am usually asleep within the first 5-10 minutes, if not sooner! 




Here's a little explanation of how a music therapist might help someone who is dealing with suicidal thoughts. She talks about how "happy music" could cause someone to go even deeper into depression, so she always feels them out a bit and tries to find a song that they can relate to. If not a song, at least a feeling. People who are depressed often find their therapy in depressing music. Hearing this, shows me that when I was younger, more depressed and angry, I actually solved my own suicidal issues by screaming out my Rage Against the Machine and Marilyn Manson. They pretty much saved my life. 

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